About

This blog is about the Ising model. The Ising model plays a central role in the theory of phase transitions. It is a mathematical model of ferromagnetism (for example, iron can be magnetized in a magnetic field, but if heated, it loses magnetization beyond Curie temperature). This blog contains Python code and a detailed algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulation of the Ising model. A corresponding numerical simulation of a continuum description of the Ising model is also provided in the second half of the blog.

The Ising model is named after Ernst Ising, Ph.D. in Physics (1924) from the University of Hamburg under the supervision of Wilhelm Lenz. Ising solved the one-dimensional (1D) Ising model exactly to find no phase transition. He also provided arguments on why there would not be a phase transition in higher dimensions either. In 1936, Peierls argued that both 2D and 3D Ising models admit phase transitions. The argument is summarised below.

The Ising Hamiltonian can be written as,

$$ \mathcal{H} = -J \sum_{\langle i j \rangle} S_{i} S_{j}. $$
  • The spins $S_{i}$ can take values $\pm 1$,
  • $\langle i j \rangle$ implies nearest-neighbor interaction only,
  • $J>0$ is the strength of exchange interaction.

The system undergoes a second order phase transition at the critical temperature $T_{c}$. For temperatures less than $T_{c}$, the system magnetizes, and the state is called the ferromagnetic or the ordered state. This amounts to a globally ordered state due to the presence of local interactions between the spin. For temperatures greater than $T_{c}$, the system is in the disordered or the paramagnetic state. In this case, there are no long-range correlations between the spins.

The order parameter

$$ m = \frac{1}{N}\sum_i S_i$$

for this system is the average magnetization. The order parameter distinguishes the two phases realized by the systems. It is zero in the disordered state, while non-zero in the ordered, ferromagnetic, state.

Peierls argument

The one dimensional (1D) Ising model does not exhibit the phenomenon of phase transition while higher dimensions do. This can be argued based on arguments, due to Peierls, related to the net change in free energy, $F = E-TS$. Here $E$ and $S$ are, respectively, the energy and entropy of the system. We estimate the net change in free energy for introducing a disorder in an otherwise ordered system. The ordered state can only be stable if the net change in free energy is positive, $\Delta F>0$, for any non-zero temperature.

1D Ising model: Introducing a domain wall (defect) in an ordered state increases the energy by $4J$, while the entropy change is $k_B \ln N$, due to $N$ choices to introduce the domain. So net change in the free energy, $\Delta F = 4J - k_BT \ln N $, is always negative for $N\rightarrow\infty$. Thus, the system prefers a disordered state. So, there is no spontaneous symmetry breaking in 1D for an infinite Ising chain. This argument can be generalized for any domain of length $L$ and higher dimensions.

2D Ising model: For two and higher dimensions, we can introduce islands of defects, which cost only at the boundaries, and are thus, proportional to the perimeter $L=\varepsilon N^2$, where $0<\varepsilon<1$. In 2D, the number of islands scale as $3^{\varepsilon N^2}$, while $\Delta E = \varepsilon 4JN^2$. $\Delta F$ is then $\varepsilon 4JN^2 - k_BT \ln (N^{2}3^{\varepsilon N^2})$. This gives a rough estimate of the critical temperature $T_{c} \sim J/k_B$.

Monte Carlo simulation of 2D Ising model

The following code simulates the Ising model in 2D using the Metropolis algorithm. The main steps of Metropolis algorithm are:

  1. Prepare an initial configuration of N spins
  2. Flip the spin of a randomly chosen lattice site.
  3. Calculate the change in energy dE.
  4. If dE < 0, accept the move. Otherwise accept the move with probability exp^{-dE/T}. This satisfies the detailed balance condition, ensuring a final equilibrium state.
  5. Repeat 2-4.

In the code below, we have estimated and plotted energy, magnetization, specific heat and susceptibility of the system.

import numpy as np
from numpy.random import rand
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy.sparse import spdiags,linalg,eye
##  BLOCK OF FUNCTIONS USED IN THE MAIN CODE
#----------------------------------------------------------------------



def initialstate(N):   
    ''' 
    Generates a random spin configuration for initial condition
    '''
    state = 2*np.random.randint(2, size=(N,N))-1
    return state



def mcmove(config, beta):
    '''
    Monte Carlo move using Metropolis algorithm 
    '''
    
    for i in range(N):
        for j in range(N):
                a = np.random.randint(0, N)
                b = np.random.randint(0, N)
                s =  config[a, b]
                nb = config[(a+1)%N,b] + config[a,(b+1)%N] + config[(a-1)%N,b] + config[a,(b-1)%N]
                cost = 2*s*nb
                
                if cost < 0:
                    s *= -1
                elif rand() < np.exp(-cost*beta):
                    s *= -1
                config[a, b] = s
    return config



def calcEnergy(config):
    '''
    Energy of a given configuration
    '''
    energy = 0 
    
    for i in range(len(config)):
        for j in range(len(config)):
            S = config[i,j]
            nb = config[(i+1)%N, j] + config[i,(j+1)%N] + config[(i-1)%N, j] + config[i,(j-1)%N]
            energy += -nb*S
    return energy/2.  # to compensate for over-counting



def calcMag(config):
    '''
    Magnetization of a given configuration
    '''
    mag = np.sum(config)
    return mag
## NOTE: change these parameters for a smaller and faster simulation 
#----------------------------------------------------------------------


nt      = 32         #  number of temperature points
N       = 10         #  size of the lattice, N x N
eqSteps = 2**8       #  number of MC sweeps for equilibration
mcSteps = 2**9       #  number of MC sweeps for calculation


T       = np.linspace(1.53, 3.28, nt); 
E,M,C,X = np.zeros(nt), np.zeros(nt), np.zeros(nt), np.zeros(nt)
n1, n2  = 1.0/(mcSteps*N*N), 1.0/(mcSteps*mcSteps*N*N) 
# divide by number of samples, and by system size to get intensive values
#  MAIN PART OF THE CODE
#----------------------------------------------------------------------


for tt in range(nt):
    config = initialstate(N)         # initialise

    E1 = M1 = E2 = M2 = 0
    iT=1.0/T[tt]; iT2=iT*iT;
    
    for i in range(eqSteps):         # equilibrate
        mcmove(config, iT)           # Monte Carlo moves

    for i in range(mcSteps):
        mcmove(config, iT)           
        Ene = calcEnergy(config)     # calculate the energy
        Mag = calcMag(config)        # calculate the magnetisation

        E1 = E1 + Ene
        M1 = M1 + Mag
        M2 = M2 + Mag*Mag 
        E2 = E2 + Ene*Ene


    # divide by number of sites and iteractions to obtain intensive values    
    E[tt] = n1*E1
    M[tt] = n1*M1
    C[tt] = (n1*E2 - n2*E1*E1)*iT2
    X[tt] = (n1*M2 - n2*M1*M1)*iT
#  plot the calculated values   
#----------------------------------------------------------------------

f = plt.figure(figsize=(18, 10)); #  


sp =  f.add_subplot(2, 2, 1 );
plt.scatter(T, E, s=50, marker='o', color='IndianRed')
plt.xlabel("Temperature (T)", fontsize=20);
plt.ylabel("Energy ", fontsize=20);         plt.axis('tight');


sp =  f.add_subplot(2, 2, 2 );
plt.scatter(T, abs(M), s=50, marker='o', color='RoyalBlue')
plt.xlabel("Temperature (T)", fontsize=20); 
plt.ylabel("Magnetization ", fontsize=20);   plt.axis('tight');


sp =  f.add_subplot(2, 2, 3 );
plt.scatter(T, C, s=50, marker='o', color='IndianRed')
plt.xlabel("Temperature (T)", fontsize=20);  
plt.ylabel("Specific Heat ", fontsize=20);   plt.axis('tight');   


sp =  f.add_subplot(2, 2, 4 );
plt.scatter(T, X, s=50, marker='o', color='RoyalBlue')
plt.xlabel("Temperature (T)", fontsize=20); 
plt.ylabel("Susceptibility", fontsize=20);   plt.axis('tight');

The quantities on the y-axis, in the above plots, are per spin. These intensive quantities have been plotted against temperature on the x-axis. It can be seen that the critical temperature for the numerical simulation of this small system is close to the known value of $T_c\sim2.269$ for a thermodynamic system.

Note: A better optimized version of the above code can be found here. One of the difference being that we do not calculate the exponential in the loop in the optimized cython version. Thus, avoiding $N^2$ calls to a special function. We can do this as the spins only take values 1 and -1. Thus, there are only two possibilities for an energy increasing move. They are:

#    d          d               u          u        
# d  d  d => d  u  d   or    u  u  u => u  d  u  
#    d          d               u          u 
#     
# change in energy is 4J
#    d          d               u          u        
# d  d  u => d  u  u   or    u  u  d => u  d  d   
#    d          d               u          u 
#     
# Here u and d are used for up and down configuration of the spins

Snapshots of the configurations

We start with a random initial condition and then plot the instantaneous configurations, as the system coarsens to its equilibrium state.

%matplotlib inline
# Simulating the Ising model


class Ising():
    ''' Simulating the Ising model '''    
    
    
    ## monte carlo moves
    def mcmove(self, config, N, beta):
        ''' This is to execute the monte carlo moves using 
        Metropolis algorithm such that detailed
        balance condition is satisified'''
        for i in range(N):
            for j in range(N):            
                    a = np.random.randint(0, N)
                    b = np.random.randint(0, N)
                    s =  config[a, b]
                    nb = config[(a+1)%N,b] + config[a,(b+1)%N] + config[(a-1)%N,b] + config[a,(b-1)%N]
                    cost = 2*s*nb
                    if cost < 0:	
                        s *= -1
                    elif rand() < np.exp(-cost*beta):
                        s *= -1
                    config[a, b] = s
        return config
    

    
    def simulate(self):   
        ''' This module simulates the Ising model'''
        N, temp     = 64, .4        # Initialse the lattice
        config = 2*np.random.randint(2, size=(N,N))-1
        f = plt.figure(figsize=(15, 15), dpi=80);    
        self.configPlot(f, config, 0, N, 1);
        
        msrmnt = 1001
        for i in range(msrmnt):
            self.mcmove(config, N, 1.0/temp)
            if i == 1:       self.configPlot(f, config, i, N, 2);
            if i == 4:       self.configPlot(f, config, i, N, 3);
            if i == 32:      self.configPlot(f, config, i, N, 4);
            if i == 100:     self.configPlot(f, config, i, N, 5);
            if i == 1000:    self.configPlot(f, config, i, N, 6);
                 
                    
    def configPlot(self, f, config, i, N, n_):
        ''' This modules plts the configuration once passed to it along with time etc '''
        X, Y = np.meshgrid(range(N), range(N))
        sp =  f.add_subplot(3, 3, n_ )  
        plt.setp(sp.get_yticklabels(), visible=False)
        plt.setp(sp.get_xticklabels(), visible=False)      
        plt.pcolormesh(X, Y, config, cmap=plt.cm.RdBu);
        plt.title('Time=%d'%i); plt.axis('tight')    
    plt.show()
rm = Ising()
rm.simulate()

Kinetic Ising Models

  • Ising model has no Hamiltonian given dynamics. For kinetics we assume that an associated heat bath generates spin flip $( S_{i} \rightarrow - S_{i})$.
  • Purely dissipative and stochastic models are ofter referred to as Kinetic Ising models.

  • There are two kinds of kinetics possible. These are,

    • Non-conserved kinetics, for example, in a spin system where the order parameter (magnetisation) is not conserved. At the microscopic level, spin-flip Glauber model is used to describe the non-conserved kinetics of the paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. A model describing the dynamics of a non-conserved scalar field has been referred to as Model A in the Hohenberg and Halperin (1977) classification of critical phenomena.
    • Conserved kinetics, for example, in the binary (AB) mixture or Lattice Gas where the order parameter (number of particles) is conserved. The spin-exchange Kawasaki model is used to describe the conserved kinetics of binary mixtures at the microscopic level. A model describing the dynamics of a conserved scalar field has been referred to as Model B in the Hohenberg and Halperin (1977) classification of critical phenomena.

Domain Growth with non-conserved kinetics

In the following we present a continuum theory for non-conserved kinetics. At the coarse-grained level, order parameters $\phi(\vec{r},t)$ is used to describe the dynamics.

  • At $t = 0,$ a paramagnetic phase is quenched below the critical temperature $T_{c}$.
  • The paramagnetic state is no longer the preferred equilibrium state.
  • The far-from-equilibrium, homogeneous, state evolves towards its new equilibrium state by separating in domains.
  • These domains coarsen with time and are characterized by length scale $L(t)$.
  • A finite system becomes ordered in either of two equivalent states as $t \rightarrow \infty$.
  • The simplest kinetics Ising model for non-conserved scalar field $\phi(\vec{r})$ is the time dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) model.

TDGL equation

The equation of motion for the order parameter $\phi$ can be written as:

$$ \frac{\partial \phi}{\partial t} = -\Gamma \frac{\delta \mathcal{F}}{\delta \phi} +\theta(\vec{r},t)$$

where $\theta$ is the noise due to the thermal bath, while $\frac{\delta \mathcal{F}}{\delta \phi}$ denotes functional derivative of free-energy functional

$$ \mathcal{F(\phi)} = \int \left[ a\phi^2 + b \phi^4 + \frac{1}{2}K(\nabla\phi)^{2}\right]$$

For $ T < T_{c} $ we can write TDGL in terms of rescaled variables as

$$ \frac{\partial \phi}{\partial t} = \phi-\phi^{3}+ \nabla^{2}\phi $$

In the next section we will simulate the TDGL equation.

# This example uses the 5-point Laplacian discretization from 
# [here](https://github.com/ketch/finite-difference-course)
#
%matplotlib inline


a,b, k = 0, 1.0, 100.0
dh, dt = 1.0, 1e-3
Ng, Tf = 256, 10001




class TDGL():
    '''
    Class to solve a PDE 
    '''
    
    def mu(self, u):
        return a*u + b*u*u*u 

    
    
    def laplacian(self, Ng):
        '''Construct a sparse matrix that applies the 5-point Laplacian discretization'''
        e=np.ones(Ng**2)
        e2=([1]*(Ng-1)+[0])*Ng
        e3=([0]+[1]*(Ng-1))*Ng
        h=dh
        A=spdiags([-4*e,e2,e3,e,e],[0,-1,1,-Ng,Ng],Ng**2,Ng**2)
        A/=h**2
        return A

    
    
    def integrate(self, L, x, y, u):
        '''  simulates the equation and plots it at different instants '''
        
        f = plt.figure(figsize=(15, 15), dpi=80);    

        for i in range(Tf):          
            u = u - dt*(self.mu(u) - k*L.dot(u))
            
            if (i==0):      self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 1, i);
            if (i==1):      self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 2, i);
            if (i==10):     self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 3, i);
            if (i==100):    self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 4, i);
            if (i==1000):   self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 5, i);
            if (i==10000):  self.configPlot(x, y, u, f, 6, i);
   


    def configPlot(self, x, y, u,f, n_, i):
        U= u.reshape((Ng, Ng))
        sp =  f.add_subplot(3, 3, n_ )  
        plt.setp(sp.get_yticklabels(), visible=False)
        plt.setp(sp.get_xticklabels(), visible=False)
        plt.pcolormesh(x,y,U, cmap=plt.cm.RdBu);
        plt.title('Time=%d'%i)
    plt.show()
rm = TDGL()   # instantiate the class

# generate the grid and initialise the field
x = np.linspace(-1,1,Ng)
y = np.linspace(-1,1,Ng)
X, Y = np.meshgrid(x, y)

u=np.random.randn(Ng*Ng, 1);  # Initial data
L = rm.laplacian(Ng)         # construct the laplacian
rm.integrate(L, x, y, u)    # simulate

#simulation completed!!